Aging and High-Density Lipoproteins
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An association between greater levels of high-density lipoproteins and lower mortality rates in old age showed up in studies of centenarians some years back, and has since been confirmed in other research. There is still the question of what this association means, however: correlation is not causation. Here is a little more on this topic:

Most coronary deaths occur in patients older than 65 years. Age associated alterations in the composition and function of high-density lipoproteins (HDL) may contribute to cardiovascular mortality. The effect of advanced age on the composition and function of HDL is not well understood. HDL was isolated from healthy young and elderly subjects. HDL composition, cellular cholesterol efflux/uptake, anti-oxidant properties and endothelial wound healing activities were assessed.

We observed a 3-fold increase of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A, an increased content of complement C3 and proteins involved in endopeptidase/protease inhibition in HDL of elderly subjects, whereas levels of apolipoprotein E were significantly decreased. HDL from elderly subjects contained less cholesterol but increased sphingomyelin. Most importantly, HDL from elderly subjects showed defective antioxidant properties, lower paraoxonase 1 activity and was more rapidly taken up by macrophages, whereas cholesterol efflux capability was not altered.

These findings suggest that aging alters HDL composition, resulting in functional impairment that may contribute to the onset/progression of cardiovascular disease.

Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23792422

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