Recent Research Data on Lack of Exercise and Obesity
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For an allegedly industrious species, we are quite indolent as individuals - or at least just as soon as we achieve a modicum of wealth and success in life. Being wealthier beats the pants off being poorer at every level of improvement, but for most people it comes with some costs as well as a universal array of benefits. You can afford better healthcare, but you are going to need it because you exercise less and eat more. The self-sabotage of an averagely unhealthy lifestyle is enabled by the trappings of modern technology, such as advances in transport, comfort, and entertainment, even as that very same technology is heading towards the establishment of science-fiction-like medicine that will defeat all disease and even aging itself in the decades ahead. For now we're stuck somewhere in the fat and unhealthy middle ground, however: enough technology to seduce us into a lazy, likely shorter life of worse health, but not yet enough technology to reliably rescue us from this fate.

Thus despite the impending golden future of medicine, it remains the case that taking basic, time-worn, good care of your health still matters. Willpower, exercise, and eating less than you want to. If you desire good odds of living to benefit from first generation rejuvenation therapies, then stay healthy on the one hand, and do all you can to help speed initiatives such as the SENS research programs on the other. Here is a small selection of recent research that might incentivize you a little on the good health side of the house:

NCI study finds extreme obesity may shorten life expectancy up to 14 years

Adults with extreme obesity have increased risks of dying at a younger age from cancer and many other causes including heart disease, stroke, diabetes, and kidney and liver diseases, according to results of an analysis of data pooled from 20 large studies of people from three countries. These groups form a major part of the NCI Cohort Consortium, which is a large-scale partnership that identifies risk factors for cancer death. After excluding individuals who had ever smoked or had a history of certain diseases, the researchers evaluated the risk of premature death overall and the risk of premature death from specific causes in more than 9,500 individuals who were class III obese and 304,000 others who were classified as normal weight.

The researchers found that the risk of dying overall and from most major health causes rose continuously with increasing BMI within the class III obesity group. Statistical analyses of the pooled data indicated that the excess numbers of deaths in the class III obesity group were mostly due to heart disease, cancer and diabetes. Years of life lost ranged from 6.5 years for participants with a BMI of 40-44.9 to 13.7 years for a BMI of 55-59.9. To provide context, the researchers found that the number of years of life lost for class III obesity was equal or higher than that of current (versus never) cigarette smokers among normal-weight participants in the same study.

Sitting too much, not just lack of exercise, is detrimental to cardiovascular health

Sedentary behavior involves low levels of energy expenditure activities such as sitting, driving, watching television, and reading, among others. The findings suggest that sedentary behavior may be an important determinant of cardiorespiratory fitness, independent of exercise. "Previous studies have reported that sedentary behavior was associated with an increased risk for cardiovascular outcomes; however, the mechanisms through which this occurs are not completely understood. Our data suggest that sedentary behavior may increase risk through an impact on lower fitness levels, and that avoiding sedentary behavior throughout the day may represent an important companion strategy to improve fitness and health, outside of regular exercise activity."

The team of physician-researchers analyzed accelerometer data from men and women between the ages of 12 and 49 with no known history of heart disease, asthma, or stroke, and measured their average daily physical activity and sedentary behavior times. Fitness was estimated using a submaximal treadmill test, and variables were adjusted for gender, age, and body mass index. The findings demonstrate that the negative effect of six hours of sedentary time on fitness levels was similar in magnitude to the benefit of one hour of exercise.

Less Exercise, Not More Calories, Responsible for Expanding Waistlines

Sedentary lifestyle and not caloric intake may be to blame for increased obesity in the US, according to a new analysis of data from the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). [In] the past 20 years there has been a sharp decrease in physical exercise and an increase in average body mass index (BMI), while caloric intake has remained steady. Investigators theorized that a nationwide drop in leisure-time physical activity, especially among young women, may be responsible for the upward trend in obesity rates.

By analyzing NHANES data from the last 20 years, researchers from Stanford University discovered that the number of US adult women who reported no physical activity jumped from 19.1% in 1994 to 51.7% in 2010. For men, the number increased from 11.4% in 1994 to 43.5% in 2010. During the period, average BMI has increased across the board, with the most dramatic rise found among young women ages 18-39.

The study looked at the escalation of obesity in terms of both exercise and caloric intake. While investigators did not examine what types of foods were consumed, they did observe that total daily calorie, fat, carbohydrate, and protein consumption have not changed significantly over the last 20 years, yet the obesity rate among Americans is continuing to rise.

Researchers also tracked the rise in abdominal obesity, which is an independent indicator of mortality even among people with normal BMIs. Abdominal obesity is defined by waist circumference of 88 cm (34.65 in) or greater for women and 102 cm (40.16 in) or greater for men. Data showed that average waist circumference increased by 0.37% per year for women and 0.27% per year for men.


Thanks NCI. This is almost as game changing as the study regarding aging and the average time a person sits..

Posted by: Donald Fry at July 12, 2014 8:25 PM
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