Anti-aging in the news

Ethics of boosting brainpower debated by researchers With this history of paying to improve our bodies and minds, why not extend that liberty to memory-improving drugs or brain-enhancing implants? These and other questions being raised by modern neuroscience were the topic of a meeting of neuroscientists, ethicists and psychologists funded by the National Science Foundation and the New York Academy of Sciences. The group's goals were to outline both the ethical issues raised by modern neuroscience and the steps scientists should take, if any.

Calorie restriction drastically reduces risk of heart attack, stroke and diabetes People who severely restrict their caloric intake drastically reduce their risk of developing diabetes or clogged arteries, the precursor to a heart attack or stroke. In fact, according to researchers at Washington University School of Medicine in St Louis, some risk factors were so low they were comparable to those of people decades younger.

Longevity gene may also predict better outcome for breast cancer patients A gene known to promote longevity in animals has now been discovered to encode a tumor suppressor - a protein that helps prevent cancer, according to a study by a team of scientists from The University of Texas M. D. Anderson Cancer Center. The new gene, which was inactivated in two-thirds of patients studied, presents a potent new target for breast cancer therapy, the researchers say.

New study looks for ways to delay disability in older adults People over age 70 represent the fastest growing segment of the United States population. Learning how to prevent or delay age-related disability in this age group is the focus of a National Institute on Aging study being led by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

The Fable of the Dragon-Tyrant Transhumanist philosopher Nick Bostrom writes a tale for the Journal of Medical Ethics, where aging is the ultimate enemy

Swimming may have anti-aging benefit U.S. researchers said they have found a possible link between swimming and staving off the effects of aging.Researchers at Indiana University said they will test their theory on competitors at the United States Masters Swimming Short Course National Championship in Indianapolis later this month, to see if swimmers' biological ages are different from their chronological ages.

Most Adults Won’t Give Up Sex for Staying Young, Senior Citizens Won’t Give Up Coffee Americans are coming out from
under the covers and unveiling their attitudes about aging. A trip to the "Fountain of Youth" may be a much desired destination on one's life itinerary, but what are Americans willing to give up for a drink of the infamous elixir? Not sex, said half of men and a third of women ages 18 to 64 in a February 2004 survey of 1,000 adults by Body Confident(TM). Those in the 64-and-over
age group named coffee (18 percent) as the item they are not willing to exchange.

Can a shot a day (safely) keep aging away? More and more Americans are turning to human growth hormones in an attempt to defy the effect of aging. But are they safe? As baby boomers mature, their desire to defy and deny the effects of aging has led them to try some very expensive and cutting-edge measures.

Fungus May Boost the Old, Out-Of-Shape Supplements made from a Chinese fungus may help older and out-of-shape people feel a bit more energized, corporate researchers said on Monday.They said people who took the supplements increased their ability to use oxygen as they exercised -- one way doctors measure fitness -- and were able to walk a mile slightly more quickly than those who took a placebo.

Acting FDA Commissioner Dr. Lester M. Crawford Outlines Science-Based Plan for Dietary Supplement Enforcement Dr. Crawford said the agency would soon provide further details about its plan to ensure that the consumer protection provisions of the 1994 Dietary Supplement Health and Education Act (DSHEA) are used effectively and appropriately. Through DSHEA, which sets up a distinct regulatory framework for dietary supplement products, Congress attempted to strike a balance between providing consumers access to dietary supplements and giving FDA regulatory authority to act against supplements or supplement ingredients that present safety problems, are marketed with false or misleading claims, or are otherwise adulterated or misbranded.

Bioethics Council Chairman Speaks With FRC About Troubling Report Family Research Council (FRC) is publishing on its website a short "Q&A" with Dr. Leon Kass, who chairs the President's Council on Bioethics. On April 1st, the Council released a report, "Reproduction and Responsibility," which touched on several issues, from embryonic stem cell research to human cloning and animal/human hybrid creations. Many pro-lifers were concerned that the report might be interpreted to call for a ban on embryonic research after 14 days, rather than from the moment life begins.

States dive into stem cell debates An annual Senate debate has hit the road, moving to 33 state legislatures considering 100 bills that alternately condemn, condone or fund embryonic stem cell research. The legislative battles culminate in a California voter initiative in November that would, if approved, pump nearly $3 billion over 10 years into such research.

The Kass Council's Ex-Friends We're used to criticism of the President's Council on Bioethics - aka the Kass council after its Chairman Leon Kass -- from liberals and libertarians. Its most recent proposals regarding embryonic stem-cell research and human cloning have it taking fire again. This time, however, it's the council's usual allies, social conservatives, who are upset.

Kerry on the Record: Stem Cell Research The bottom line is that Kerry has pledged to increase stem cell research if elected president.Charging that the Bush administration has an “anti-science attitude,” Kerry, a practicing Roman Catholic, has steered clear of berating George Bush’s own strong faith that has made the president less than comfortable with stem cell research that involves using human embryos.

New theory on use of hormone therapy Despite recent controversy over treatments, experts now look at whether estrogen given at the onset of menopause will curb heart disease. Just weeks after the National Institutes of Health halted a massive study, finding estrogen's risks outweigh benefits for post-menopausal women, a privately funded trial will look at whether hormone therapy prevents hardening of the arteries in younger women, age 40-55.

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Antiaging in the News

World’s oldest mouse reaches milestone birthday U-M’s geriatric mouse colony helps scientists learn about human aging

Gastric Bypass May Lengthen Lifespan Recent research has shown that gastric bypass not only helps patients take excess weight off and keep it off, it may also increase life expectancy by three years or more.

More Intimations of a Human Longevity Dependence on Atmospheric CO2 Concentration If we are right on this point, this phenomenon should have had a major impact on human health and, consequently, life span over the past two centuries; and when we look at the data pertaining to this subject, we see that something has definitely done so.

Bioethical demand and supply The reading-collection, Being Human, is a big hit, but they won't print any more copies.

Methuselah Man
Biologist Aubrey de Grey is convinced that mice—and people—should be able to live for a very long time.

Estrogen No Overall Benefit in Disease Prevention The latest analysis of data from the Women's Health Initiative (WHI) shows that estrogen replacement therapy after menopause doesn't improve long-term health. While it decreases the risk of fractures, it increases the risk of stroke.

New study looks for ways to delay disability in older adults People over age 70 represent the fastest growing segment of the United States population. Learning how to prevent or delay age-related disability in this age group is the focus of a National Institute on Aging study being led by Wake Forest University Baptist Medical Center.

Attack of the Movie Clones In an upcoming movie, a child who dies at 8 is cloned for the grieving couple. But once the child reaches the age of 8 (again), he becomes evil . Something about the way Wells programmed the boy makes Adam a bad clone once he reaches the age at which he died.

Putting Professors Out to Pasture But as human life spans continue to rise, researchers say that the rules regarding retirement must keep pace.

Drug Raises Good Cholesterol 100% Mimics genetic mutation linked to exceptional longevity

World's Oldest Worker Quits at 104

In France, where nurseries and retirement homes are in short supply, two institutions have combined

Automation could solve the huge and growing need for human labor to take care of growing elderly populations.Advocates see robots serving not just as helpers - carrying out simple chores and reminding patients to take their medication - but also as companions, even if the machines can carry on only a semblance of a real dialogue.

Sandel, Pinker Debate Genetics Michael Sandel and Steven Pinker went head to head last night debating the ethics of designer genes, free-market eugenics and hyper-parenting.

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Anti-aging in the news

Reproduction and Responsibility: The Regulation of New Biotechnologies The latest report from the bioethics commission

Attempt to crack the ageing code Scientists are trying to find out which genes govern whether or not people live long lives.

The Quest to Forget Scientists are defending and developing a new science that can be called therapeutic forgetting. They are bucking the current trend in memory research, which is to find a drug or a gene that will help people remember. They are, instead, trying to help people forget.

Older people recover from disabling events at higher rate than previously thought Approximately four out of every five newly-disabled older people regain the ability to live independently within 6 months of their disability episode, a higher recovery rate than previously reported

Chasing the Youth Pill Drugs that might extend human life are one of the hottest topics in biotech. Some of them are already here.

Cheating nature? The Bush administration has been accused of manipulating science. It is now fighting back

Panel limits use of embryos US President's Council restricts study of embryos past 14 days, silent on work before that.

The Doctor Is In Kass, the head of the president’s bioethics commission on assisted reproduction, cloning, council critics & more

Sweet Banquet of the Mind Turns Sour If any place should be an enclave of polite discourse, you would think it would be those advisory councils that exist at the discretion of the White House and Congress to give advice on scientific matters. But apparently, that would be expecting too much for the President's Council on Bioethics.

The Altered Human Is Already Here In popular imagination, the technologically altered human being is a cross between RoboCop and the Borg.The hardware that would make such a mating of humans, silicon chips and assorted weaponry a reality is, unfortunately, still on back order.Many people, however, have already made a different kind of leap into the posthuman future

Study identifies predictors of Alzheimer's disease longevity Scientists are trying to find out which genes govern whether or not people live long lives.

Gene May Link Aging and Cancer Mice without it are unable to develop liver tumors

Ageless Bodies and Happy Souls: The Future of Aging in a Biotech Era This Monday, an Interview with Leon Kass, MD, Chairman, President's Council on Bioethics

Brain Stem Cell "Fountain of Youth" Discovered Growth factors could allow the use of neural stem cells for treating such diseases as Parkinson's

Turning back time Dr. Michael Fossel will have his second book, "Cells, Aging, and Human Disease" released in June. The academic text is target toward undergraduate upperclassmen and graduate students and addresses ideas about living longer lives.

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