Stephen Spindler Wants Your Suggestions on Mouse Longevity Studies

I notice that researcher Stephen Spindler is soliciting the healthy life extension community of sci.life-extension for suggestions as to further compounds to test in his ongoing mouse longevity studies.

Does anyone have suggestions of single or groups of supplements, food additives or drugs to test in mouse lifespan studies?

I have funding for such studies. If you do, please forward your suggestions to me. Please include some information about the rationale for the suggestions.

I am already aware of and considering the following:

ALT-711
Metformin
Torcetrapib
Acipimox
Metoprolol
NAP
Teriparatide
cgk733
srt501
Desferrioxamine
fisetin
lipoic acid [We tested this at 600 mg/kilogram of the control diet alone and with n-acetyl-l-cysteine (2000) & vitamin E (585) & lycopene (300) and found no effect]
propyl gallate
Trolox
Tocopherol monoglucoside (TMG), a water soluble derivative of vitamin E
Ascorbyl palmitate (PROBABLY NOT SUITABLE)
Taxifolin
LY294002
Chenodiol (kee-noe-DYE-ole) (a.k.a. chenodeoxycholic acid)
Loxapine succinate
synthetic beta-amino acid proteins
buckyball c60 antioxidants
EUK antioxidant compounds
statins
resveratrol derivatives
lithium
anti-convulsants
dichloroacetate
rapamycin
pineal hormones. 5 in all.
cortagen, epithalon, vilon, livagen, prostamax other short synthetic peptides.
ACE inhibitors
Januvia (Merck) (a.k.a. LAF237)
Exenatide (a.k.a. Exendin-4, marketed as Byetta) (Amylin Pharmaceuticals, Inc. and Eli Lilly and Company)
Lipoxygenase Inhibitors
AICAR
Go6976
Imatinib (a.k.a. Gleevec, Imatinib Mesylate, STI571, CGP57148B)
Inhibitors of PDGF receptor
Gefitinib
Erlotinib
AG1024
Cetuximab
PhGalpha
Enzastaurin
Arxxant (ruboxistaurin)
KAI-9803
PKC412
mannoheptulose
phenyl isopropyl adenosine
phlorizin
bitter melon

And the NIA interventions testing program is already testing:

Aspirin
4-OH-PBN
NFP
NDGA
Enalapril
CAPE high
CAPE low
Rapamycin
Simvastatin high
Simvastatin low
Resveratrol high
Resveratrol low

Thanks,

Steve Spindler

Stephen R. Spindler, Ph.D.
Professor
Department of Biochemistry
University of California, Riverside
Riverside CA 92521
http://www.biochemistry.ucr.edu/faculty/spindler.html

It has to be said, and I'm sure I've said it before, that I don't see this sort of thing as the path to the future. Consider that a decade or two from now, simulated mice on silicon will be cheap, and millions of compounds will be testable every year. Just how great a benefit can the study of a few thousand compounds between now and then gain versus, say, research aimed at advancing biomolecular repair technologies aimed at the known and suspected causes of aging?

That said, my suggestion is to pick a few of the class of compounds employed by Skulachev to target antioxidants to mitochondria without the need for gene therapy, and which were demonstrated to extend healthy life in mice - I'd like to see that replicated in a US laboratory.

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Comments

Simulated mice in a decade or two? Do you mean digital simulations of biological mice? How is this going to be achieved exactly? Usually a simulation involves first knowing/understanding every relevant detail of a system - this is a necessity for constructing the simulation to begin with.

*It seems to me* that our current understanding of mouse biology is very(very very very) far from the level of understanding necessary to build a simulation that is of sufficient fidelity to replace real mice for most complex experimentation purposes. It seems unlikely and unrealistic *to me* that the necessary understanding will be available in a decade or two - how do you propose this is going to be achieved?

Posted by: Anon at February 3rd, 2012 12:14 AM

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