AGEs and Alzheimer's Disease

It can be argued that advanced glycation endproducts play an important role in Alzheimer's disease, as well as other degenerations of aging. Here is a review paper on the topic: "Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common dementia disorder of later life. Although there might be various different triggering events in the early stages of the disease, they appear to converge on a few characteristic final pathways in the late stages, characterized by inflammation and neurodegeneration. Here, we review the hypothesis that advanced glycation end products (AGEs), which reflect carbonyl stress, an imbalance between the production of reactive carbonyl compounds and their detoxification, can serve as biomarkers for the progression of disorder. AGE modification may explain many of the neuropathological and biochemical features of AD, such as extensive protein cross-linking shown as amyloid plaques and neurofibrillary tangles, inflammation, oxidative stress and neuronal cell death. Although accumulation of AGEs is a normal feature of aging, it appears to be significantly accelerated in AD. We suggest that higher AGE concentrations in brain tissue and in cerebrospinal fluid might be able to distinguish between normal aging and AD." Effective removal of AGEs through strategies such as bioremediation is one part of the SENS research agenda.

Link: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/21275816

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