Growth Hormone and Zebrafish Regeneration

An investigation of the role of growth hormone in the regenerative capacity of zebrafish: "Unlike mammals, teleost fishes are capable of regenerating sensory inner ear hair cells that have been lost following acoustic or ototoxic trauma. Previous work indicated that immediately following sound exposure, zebrafish saccules exhibit significant hair cell loss that recovers to pre-treatment levels within 14 days. Following acoustic trauma in the zebrafish inner ear, we used microarray analysis to identify genes involved in inner ear repair following acoustic exposure. Additionally, we investigated the effect of growth hormone (GH) on cell proliferation in control zebrafish utricles and saccules, since GH was significantly up-regulated following acoustic trauma. ... Pathway Analysis software was used to reveal networks of regulated genes and showed how GH affected these networks. Subsequent experiments showed that intraperitoneal injection of salmon growth hormone significantly increased cell proliferation in the zebrafish inner ear. ... GH injection increased cell proliferation in the inner ear of non-sound-exposed zebrafish, suggesting that GH could play an important role in sensory hair cell regeneration in the teleost ear."

Link: http://dx.doi.org/10.1186/1471-2202-12-88

Comments

IMO it's a waste of money and scientists. We should only focus on mammals, because humans are no fish. It won't help us much, if at all.

Posted by: Nick at September 6th, 2011 12:02 PM

Very interesting item; direct application of HGH was apparently used...I've yet to read the entire journal article, it's at http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1471-2202-12-88.pdf

I do intend looking into this a bit further; the prospect of possible human application is very interesting...

Posted by: Robert E. Yorke at September 13th, 2011 12:16 PM

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