Aubrey de Grey on Longevity Science

Here is a recently posted video in which SENS Foundation cofounder Aubrey de Grey discusses the mechanisms of aging and what to do about them:

Aubrey de Grey is a well-known researcher on the process of ageing. He sees ageing as a disease and believes science will soon be able to slow it down so that we'll have more time for science to advance even further so we can fix the cellular damages of ageing and - maybe one day - live forever.

"Live forever" is such a clumsy shortage for agelessness achieved through medical technology, given that you'd have to put in a lot of work to push much past a few thousand years in a human body - even with a risk function for fatal accidents that is small compared to the present day. But you can't exactly stop people from using the phrase.

The video above was published by Basil Gelpke, who is also behind Human 2.0, a DVD release that examines the prospects for engineered longevity, among other topics of interest to transhumanists. It's subtitled in German, but is English language:

The human being will be the first species able to understand its own blueprint. The rapidly increasing knowledge of genetics, nanotechnology, robotics, and AI will dwarf everything philosophers, scientists, science fiction writers and other visionaries have ever conceived. Human life without disease and possibly even without death doesn't seem impossible anymore.
Comments

de Grey accent assaults my ear drums. I would have liked it if his video had subtitles as well.

Posted by: JohnD at October 5th, 2012 8:25 PM

Hello my name is Shakiel Henry I have read a great deal about the process of aging. As I am reading there is some thing that keeps bringing back to the reason why people who have live healthier life still don't make it pass one hundred. How a simple fall, trip, or back injury can be fatal. I think everything comes down to the DNA. I understand the contributions the human gnome project made in sequencing the DNA but that does nothing to understand it

Posted by: shakiel Henry at June 26th, 2014 8:37 PM

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