Exploring Genetic Regulation of Heart Regeneration

Will it be possible in years ahead to temporarily adjust the programming of existing cell populations in the body to cause them to regenerate from damage and injuries more effectively than is presently the case? Most likely so, though it is a fair distance from present early explorations to a safe and effective therapy. Here is an example of work presently underway in the laboratory:

"We found that the activity of the Meis1 gene increases significantly in heart cells soon after birth, right around the time heart muscle cells stop dividing. Based on this observation we asked a simple question: If the Meis1 gene is deleted from the heart, will heart cells continue to divide through adulthood? The answer is 'yes.'"

The research team demonstrated that deletion of Meis1 extended the proliferation period in the hearts of newborn mice, and also re-activated the regenerative process in the adult mouse heart without harmful effect on cardiac functions. This new finding demonstrates that Meis1 is a key factor in the regeneration process, and the understanding of the gene's function may lead to new therapeutic options for adult heart regeneration. The findings also provide a possible alternative to current adult heart regeneration research, which focuses on the use of stem cells to replace damaged heart cells.

"Meis1 is a transcription factor, which acts like a software program that has the ability to control the function of other genes. In this case, we found that Meis1 controls several genes that normally act as brakes on cell division. As such, Meis1 could possibly be used as an on/off switch for making adult heart cells divide. If done successfully, this ability could introduce a new era in treatment for heart failure."

Link: http://www.utsouthwestern.edu/newsroom/news-releases/year-2013/april/heart-sadek.html

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