Death Receptors as Biomarkers for Cardiovascular Mortality

Researchers here present evidence for the appropriately named death receptors to be biomarkers for cardiovascular disease risk, an indirect measure of the damage accumulating in the vascular system over the course of aging, and its effects on cellular biochemistry. The research community is very interested in establishing reliable, easily measured biomarkers that relate to age-related disease, mortality, and known mechanisms of aging. The more that exist, the more likely it is that these biomarkers can be combined in some algorithmic way to generate a more precise overall biomarker of biological age - something that can be used to rapidly assess the performance of the first rejuvenation therapies, as they arrive, and to steer their development.

Death receptors are activated, for example, in the case of infections when white blood cells that have combatted a virus are to be removed. It was previously known that death receptors in the blood can be measured, but not whether an elevated level was linked to increased cell death in type 2 diabetes and arteriosclerosis. The aim of the study was therefore to investigate whether "death receptors" could be used as a marker that could be linked to ongoing tissue damage and if this could be used to predict the risk of developing diseases. The results show that increased cell death can be linked to increased levels in the blood of three different members of the same "death receptor family" (TNFR-1, TRAILR-2 and Fas). Increased cell death is seen in type 2 diabetes as well as arteriosclerosis.

High blood sugar and blood fats (low levels of HDL, "the good cholesterol") subject the body's blood vessels and insulin-producing beta cells to stress. Long-term stress damages the cells and can cause the death receptors on the surface of the cell to trigger a cell suicide program within the cell. "When the beta cells are damaged, the production of insulin decreases, which increases the risk of diabetes. The damage activates repair processes in the blood vessels. If these are not properly resolved, this usually leads to the development of plaque in the blood vessels (arteriosclerosis). The formation of cracks in this plaque is the primary cause of myocardial infarction and stroke."

The study also looked at the connections between different risk factors - age, BMI, blood fats, blood sugar and blood pressure - and the death receptors TNFR-1, TRAILR-2 and Fas in blood samples from 4,742 people who are part of the population study Malmö Diet Cancer. Samples from the 1990s were compared with the risk of suffering from diabetes, heart attack, and stroke in the coming 20 years. The results show clear links between the level of death receptors in the blood and the different risk factors. High levels of death receptors were common in diabetics which indicates increased cell stress and risk of damage to different organs. Among non-diabetics, high levels of death receptors were linked with an increased risk of developing diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. This indicates that the level of death receptors in the blood reflects the damage that the risk factors cause in different organs.



There seems to be a strong Lab Bias in the search for bio markers, probably a carry over from the mindset of general medical health testing, find a test that is convienient for the doctor regardless if it is a useful proxy. It seems to me the best bio marker of cardiovascular health would be an actual direct test of cardiovascular health like how long it takes you to run a mile.

Posted by: JohnD at December 12th, 2017 1:30 PM

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